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Press releases from Human Reproduction 2015

New research shows ovarian transplants appear to be safe and effective

Women who have ovarian tissue removed, stored and then transplanted back to them at a later date have a good chance of successfully becoming pregnant, according to a review of the largest series of ovarian transplants performed worldwide.

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Mathematical model major aid in family planning

At what age should couples start trying to conceive if they want one, two, or three children?
Erasmus MC researchers, participating in an international study, have developed a mathematical model that can assist couples in having the number of children that they would ideally like. The model predicts the age at which couples should start having children depending on whether they want one, two or three kids. The results have just been published in the journal Human Reproduction.

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First live birth after transplantation of ovarian tissue removed and frozen during childhood

A young woman has become the first in the world to give birth to a healthy child after doctors restored her fertility by transplanting ovarian tissue that had been removed and frozen while she was a child.

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Pesticides in fruit and vegetables linked to semen quality
The first study to investigate the relationship between eating fruit and vegetables containing pesticide residues and the quality of men’s semen has shown a link with lower sperm counts and percentages of normally-formed sperm.

The study, which is published online today (Tuesday) in Human Reproduction, one of the world’s leading reproductive medicine journals, shows that men who ate the highest amount of fruit and vegetables with high levels of pesticide residue had a 49% lower sperm count and a 32% lower percentage of normally-formed sperm than men who consumed the least amount. An accompanying editorial says the findings have important implications for human health.



Fifteen million unwanted pregnancies a year caused by underuse of modern contraception

Fifteen million out of 16.7 million unwanted pregnancies a year could be avoided in 35 low- and middle-income countries if women had the opportunity to use modern methods of contraception, according to a study that applies to about one-third of the world’s population.

The authors of the study point out that women who become pregnant unintentionally in these countries may face a stark future including death, disease, disability or lower educational or employment opportunities. In addition, many unintended pregnancies end in induced abortions. The burden of unwanted pregnancies falls hardest on the poor and less well educated. The study is published online on Wednesday 4 February 2015 in Human Reproduction, one of the world’s leading reproductive medicine journals.

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Sugary drinks linked to earlier onset of menstrual periods

Girls who frequently consume sugary drinks tend to start their menstrual periods earlier than girls who do not, according to new research published on 28 January 2015 in Human Reproduction, one of the world’s leading reproductive medicine journals.

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Largest study of babies born after infertility treatment shows significant improvements in health over past 20 years

The last two decades has seen a steady improvement in the health outcomes of children born after assisted reproduction (ART), with fewer babies being born preterm, with low birth weight, stillborn or dying within the first year of life.

These findings come from the largest study to date to investigate the health of ART babies over time; data from more than 92,000 children in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden were analysed for the study, which is published online on Wednesday 21 January 2015 in Human Reproduction, one of the world’s leading reproductive medicine journals.

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