ESHRE Position Papers

The Thessaloniki ESHRE/ESGE consensus on diagnosis of female genital anomalies

Accurate diagnosis of congenital anomalies still remains a clinical challenge because of the drawbacks of the previous classification systems and the non-systematic use of diagnostic methods with varying accuracy, some of them quite inaccurate. Currently, a wide range of non-invasive diagnostic procedures are available enriching the opportunity to accurately detect the anatomical status of the female genital tract, as well as a new objective and comprehensive classification system with well-described classes and sub-classes.

What is the recommended diagnostic work-up of female genital anomalies according to the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE)/European Society for Gynaecological Endoscopy (ESGE) system? 

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 Stem cells in reproductive medicine: ready for the patient?

Research in stem cells and regenerative medicine is growing in scope, and its translation to the clinic is heralded by the recent initiation of controlled clinical trials with pluripotent derived cells. Unfortunately, stem cell ‘treatments’ are currently offered to patients outside of the controlled framework of scientifically sound research and regulated clinical trials. Both physicians and patients in reproductive medicine are often unsure about stem cells therapeutic options. 

Are there effective and clinically validated stem cell-based therapies for reproductive diseases?

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The ESHRE/ESGE consensus on the classification of female genital tract congenital anomalies

Congenital malformations of the female genital tract are common miscellaneous deviations from normal anatomy with health and reproductive consequences. Until now, three systems have been proposed for their categorization but all of them are associated with serious limitations.

What classification system is more suitable for the accurate, clear, simple and related to the clinical management categorization of female genital anomalies?

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